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Thread: Teaching Standards

  1. #11
    Mega Maniac Wildernessgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCoyote View Post
    Airbear, i had similar situations. i had ONE math teacher in high school that did try, and i wanted so badly to make him proud of his efforts, but i really did not grasp the concept of the whole geometry/algebra thing UNTIL ........ i got a job where i was actually building things with my hands, using the tools and the science in a real life situation. i never could grasp it with just reading the directions. i had to get my hands around it in order to get my head around it. ((i blame my mom for jinxing me though. that school required more credits than the state required for graduation, which basically meant i wasnt graduating -changed schools again so it didnt matter lol - but her closing argument to the school was "she doesnt NEED that much! she isnt going to grow up to build rockets or dog houses!" ... the damned teacher said "Well you dont know that".... low and behold three two and a half years after graduating there i was .. not building rockets or dog houses but measuring and cutting and building blinds and draperies for windows lol!) To this day i dont know why no one suggested i take a shop class. i guess because i was a girl and preferred reading? *shrug* who knows. but the one thing i did learn was that not everyone learns the same way and its unfair to force people to conform or fail. in my psychology classes we learned about that sort of thing. and yet in other classes you read the chapter, you did the work and you moved on. it was like marching through a strange canyon. if you unlucky enough to stumble, get confused, fall behind, you were LEFT behind... and often times were taunted by the others because "You're too stupid, jeez everyone knows how to do this! you have to be some kind of idiot not to get it"

    As for homeschooling -
    i've been doing a lot of reading and studying about the subject and i agree its not something to jump into without a care.. i met one kid that was homeschooled(when i was in the high school from hell) - he was AWESOME! Very good looking, very outgoing, AND a gymnast! he didnt stay there long in that school however.... no need to ask why.
    one of my cousins home schooled her kids for several years but ended up putting them in public school when she got divorced. her two oldest are in gifted classes. her youngest was put into pre-K and he's everyone's biggest challenge. he got to start school from the ground up like most people, and he's just not having a good time of it... But before her divorce, during the summer we would all pile into my car and drive to the beach or the zoo, on the way there the kids would be doing their lessons. they were all three smart - too smart sometimes, they could embarrass you if you tried to answer their questions thinking they were too young to understand(like where do babies come from, birds migrating, and whys does the sky turn red when the sun sets etc.)

    And my other cousin who will be beginning home schooling; we've struck up a deal. where i lack math skills i make up for in english/reading and history. she was never too keen on history or reading but she knows the science/math stuff that i never could grasp. Her oldest son will be going into second grade, and her youngest will be starting kindergarten - my oldest will also be starting Kindergarten about the same time. my youngest is smart enough that he could very easily do everything they do.
    and being social is no problem. my kids arent in day care but they're not shy with strangers. but they arent so friendly as to let anyone grab them.

    But what i like best about home schooling is we can go their pace. we dont have to wait for 25 other people to get it, we have more time to teach, no class changes, bus rides, school lunch periods etc. once they get the lesson, they GET it. and then we move on. if they dont get it then we can work on it longer. you can teach anywhere - like my cousin did with her kids in the car, or at the beach, park, etc - You can join with other home school families or do it yourself. you can buy CDs, DVDs, books, lesson plans etc. or you can work with others who already have those things.

    i love this video about home schooling lol http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQoSRfu5z_4
    same here. I never really understood certain aspects of algebra, fractions, etc. until I started doing things where I was using those concepts and then it seemed so simple.

    Teachers needed to understand as well that students learn differently and how to reach various students when teaching.

  2. #12
    Macho Maniac Jill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildernessgirl View Post
    The just had an article in Time magazine about how bad teachers need to be fired. I agree completely. It mentioned that research shows that students who have two bad teachers in row have a very difficult time ever recovering and are more likely to drop out or have poor grades years later. Students who have at least one very good teacher have a much better outcome later.

    My dad is a physics professor and has won numerous awards for teaching. He does a course in summers for elementary and middle school teachers to help them teach science in their own classrooms. He was shocked at some of the public school teachers that attended. One didn't know the difference between "dear" and "deer" when writing. Another one insisted on needing a calculator to find out what 8x0 was because she didn't know that anything x 0 equals 0.

    I'm not sure how we should go about it but bad teachers need to be held accountable and be reviewed each year and be given warnings if they don't improve let go.
    I agree. One way to ensure accountability is for the school's Principal teacher and department heads to observe and critique teachers in the classroom often. In most schools, teachers might be observed once if at al. Professional development is also key to improving a teacher's performance. Many school districts do not have the funding or do not budget for professional development. Even in states/districts where professional development is required, it is a minimum requirement.

    Once a teacher is tenured it is almost impossible to fire him or her. They are backed by the NEA and state and local teachers' unions that are very powerful politically.

    I am a former school teacher and I think tenure is wrong. Why should teaching, of all professions, be exempt from accountability? How long would other professionals maintain their jobs if their performances failed to meet certain standards/criteria? We entrust our children and our future to these people. If teachers can't teach, they should be fired.

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  3. #13
    Reporter Liberty's Avatar
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    Default Texas is making changes too...

    I think they should just let students evaluate their teachers like in college...of course I don't know how well students at that age could judge someone. I think it might turn into a popularity contest, hm...okay, scratch that idea.

    I was lucky to have had mostly awesome teachers growing up. You can clearly tell they love their job, and were passionate about what they were teaching. They there were those that came off like they hated being there, hated children altogether. I've had a few teachers like that and it traumatized me. To this day, a big factor in why I don't talk much (in real life) is because of them.

    I read that Texas conservatives are changing textbooks, and not in a good way. This makes me sick and sad for my state.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/13/ed...n/13texas.html

    Anita: The university requirements is one thing I actually do like about our system. Many people going into college not knowing what they want to do career wise, and in other parts of the world they have to make a choice entering college. I like that all majors have to go through a "basics" because I feel like it gives us a well rounded education. My friends and I have changed our majors a few times, and if it wasn't for the basics I'd have a lot of catching up to do. I went from majoring in fashion designing, to nursing, to pre-med, to archeology, and finally journalism.
    Last edited by Liberty; 03-23-2010 at 05:46 PM.

  4. #14
    Deus nobiscum quis contra Conoga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liberty View Post
    I think they should just let students evaluate their teachers like in college...of course I don't know how well students at that age could judge someone. I think it might turn into a popularity contest, hm...okay, scratch that idea.
    this was how i evaluated my teachers in 1st grade. FYI - i was held back in first grade because they thought i wasnt "mature" enough to move forward....
    i think its funny that i couldnt spell "wort" but i could spell "because"



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    Last edited by Conoga; 03-23-2010 at 05:59 PM.

  5. #15
    Got Kilt? Beware_of_Italics's Avatar
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    I work in a school district, and my sister teaches 4th grade and just got her principalship. All I know is there are some BAD and GOOD teachers out there. The same can be said for the students.

    I like Liberty's idea of evaluations from the students. Teachers are evaluated of course, but it'd be nice to hear from the kiddos that enter that classroom every single day.

    And just because a child doesn't do well in school, that doesn't always mean the teacher is at fault. I know it does happen though.

    Recently, my sister evaluated our little cousin's trouble with school and he has a really bad teacher.

  6. #16
    Reporter Liberty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beware_of_Italics View Post

    And just because a child doesn't do well in school, that doesn't always mean the teacher is at fault. I know it does happen though.
    Totally agree. Sometimes it's hard for kids who have problems at home to focus in school, and some kids have learning disabilities that no one bothers to check on until later in life.

  7. #17
    Deus nobiscum quis contra Conoga's Avatar
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    i would like to think the kids struggling with problems at home would be the minority. to say the entire class is failing because of problems at home might going too far. SOMETIMES it isnt if the school is in a particularly bad area with high crime rates... but sometimes its the foundation that was struck when the students were in elementary. once they learn that no one can really harm them for being lazy... what do you do? what CAN you do, especially if they have been allowed to be lazy for too long?

  8. #18
    Got Kilt? Beware_of_Italics's Avatar
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    Yeah, if it's the entire class that's failing I think it's safe to say the teacher is the problem.

  9. #19
    Reporter Liberty's Avatar
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    If the entire class is failing it's pretty obvious where the problem is.

    I don't like the No child left behind act either. It puts the teacher and students in a tough spot. It's putting a lot of pressures on the teachers to make the students succeed, and compromising the student's education. It either takes the fun out of learning, or teachers end up dumbing down the curriculum and the kids end up not learning anything.

  10. #20
    Just a girl MissAmy's Avatar
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    I don't like the No child left behing act also. Because each child learns differently, some learn fast while other might be slow at learning and trying to teach each child the same tends to be hard for the teacher.

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